Live. Learn. Run.

Just another WordPress.com site

A Day On January 15, 2011

Filed under: Uncategorized — taliabuford @ 3:05 pm

When the clock went off at 6:30, I didn’t want to get out of bed. But I knew I had to be at S.O.M.E. in the next 20 minutes, so I hopped to it.

I’m not a morning person. At all. But I wasn’t getting up for myself. I was getting up to help someone else. So I prayed as I walked the three blocks to the soup kitchen at 71 O St. NW, thanking God for the resources and opportunities I had been blessed with.

When I got into the offices, they’d already started orientation. Dirk Whatley, the volunteer coordinator was telling the volunteers about the people they would be serving, and the services that S.O.M.E. offers. At this location, in addition to offering food, patrons are provided with a place to shower. At locations throughout the city, the organization provides education and health services, and even a shelter for the elderly.

The main dining room seats 160 people. During one shift, about 300 people will walk through the doors to receive a meal. There’s a system that keeps things moving along quickly. Two lines of volunteers flank the food and provide plates, assembly line style to the end of the line, where two volunteers are waiting to hand out the plates as people come into the door. The diners take their plates and any other belongings they come in with, to the tables, where forks, napkins, cups and water pitchers are placed. Everyone gets one plate. You can opt out of something we’re serving, but you can’t double up.

Another set of volunteers roams through the dining room, serving coffee. In the kitchen, yet another group of volunteers is cooking the food.

I got placed on the food line. My item? Bread. I kind of wished I had a more active role, but I just reminded myself that I was part of the whole that provided food to the visitors.

Some of the people spoke to us as they passed the line. Most didn’t. As one of the volunteers closest to the door, I got to see the people who were coming in. Some of them looked stereotypically homeless: layered unkempt clothes, scruffy faces, lots of bags. But others, I was surprised at. A few men, maybe 25 or so, came in wearing what I thought were nice leather jackets. One man walked through the door proclaiming “This is for all the women on the line who like men, homeless or not!” and then proceeded to play what I think was “It’s Raining Men” from the older model Mac laptop he was carrying. The employees made him turn it down (I think they bribed him with an additional piece of bacon).

I looked out at the people eating breakfast during one break in the line and realized what a difference a change of scenery makes. I walk by the corner where S.O.M.E. is located nearly every day. It’s along the route I take to go to school. I normally walk by quickly with either a neutral face, or a slight scowl, in hopes of deterring anyone from trying me. If I’d seen any of these people on the streets, I wouldn’t have looked at them, or I would have scurried quickly past. But here, as I served food, I was smiling at them. Saying ‘good morning.’ Inside, I was a little ashamed that my behavior wasn’t the same both inside and outside of the S.O.M.E. walls.

At the end of the shift, at 8:30 a.m., we wiped down all of the tables and chairs (as we had done midway through service) and replenished the napkins, cups and forks at each table. Someone ran a mop while others washed dishes. I busied myself in whatever way I could, wiping chairs, placing cups and packaging leftovers into large aluminum pans.

Truth be told, I loved it. I miss doing community service. And serving food is something I’m accustomed to since I was always on the food committee at my church back in Rhode Island. As I left, I realized this was an easy way for me to give back to the community. I got Dirk’s card as I left the building. I told him I live a few blocks from here and I’d like to volunteer more regularly. He said to shoot him an e-mail and we can talk availability. If anyone wants to come with me, let me know. We’ll set a date. They serve breakfast and lunch daily, so there are always opportunities.

First Street NW was bright when I stepped out of the doors of S.O.M.E. My fellow volunteers walked to the left toward their cars. I turned right to walk home. I noticed a man who had passed through the line standing off to the side of the sidewalk. I looked him in his eyes, flashed a smile and said “Have a nice day.”

He smiled and wished me one in return.

Advertisements
 

Making Progress

Filed under: Uncategorized — taliabuford @ 1:58 am

Yes, it’s Friday night and I’m blogging. But only to keep from cleaning.

Tomorrow I’m having some people over for food and games. But, I wanted to give a quick update.

In addition to signing up for jazz class on Wednesday, tomorrow, I will be volunteering at So Others Might Eat with the Alliance for Women in Media – National Capital Area Chapter  as a part of their observance of Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. I used to volunteer a lot more when I was in college, and when I had a church home, so this service is something that my soul has been crying out for.

Bright and early, I’ll be slanging eggs and whatnot. That should be cool. I might even be able to get a nap in before people start ringing my doorbell.

But tonight? Back to cleaning.

*cranks up “General Patton”*

Lata.

 

I like the way you move January 13, 2011

Filed under: Uncategorized — taliabuford @ 2:38 am

I was psyched about going to class tonight. I’m not even sure how it came about. It just all came together.

I was with Veronica Tuesday and she suggested I go to the intro to jazz class at her dance company, Contradiction Dance. I scoffed at first, then said, okay. I mean, I do have a slate of classes to finish by the end of this year — I promised myself.

So today, she and I made our way to Silver Spring, took off our shoes and got ready to move.

I’ll say this: it moves quickly.

But not even. Like, I felt like as it was going along, I could follow and that I was doing what I needed to do. But by the end of the class, when we had done like, three movements (not sure if that’s the right word) of a dance the instructor was teaching us, I was looking back like, how did we get here?

How’d I do?

There were some missteps. Quite a few. I don’t have a ton of rhythm, so I watched the instructor a lot. That was cool when she was in front of me. But then, I’d have to do it with another student and I couldn’t look at her. So I kinda felt like I had two left feet at times. I think it was also a little frustrating because I’d just done it not 30 seconds prior when she was leading us through, but I was stumbling trying to replicate it.

I’d talked with her prior to class beginning and she said she was going to try to convince me to sign up for the entire class. I was skeptical.

But at the end of the class, I wanted to finish it. I wanted to at least be able to get those moves down. And I did say I wanted to take a class. Why not this one? Why not now?

So, for the next 7 weeks, my Wednesday night dance card is full. Now let’s hope I can just get the whole counting-in-your-head-while-listening-to-music-and-moving-your-body thing down by then.

I’ll let you know how it goes.